Bio

I have traveled most of my life to foreign countries and to different states of the US, but Hawaii has always been my home. I am of Native Hawaiian descent and my family is from Moloka'i, Hawai'i, but because I had travelled so much growing up I assimilated myself with the host culture of that particular place. So, as I grew older I had a strong desire to learn more about myself and what it means to be Hawaiian. When I came back to Hawai'i I immersed myself in the learning of my own culture. As time passed I began to progress in a few of the arts of my people such as hula (dance), mele (song), oli (chant), and various other na mea o Hawai'i.

All of my life experience and my passions have set me on a path to share my culture with others and to become a person that is in balance with the world. As I progress forward in my life’s’ journey I take with me the teachings of my people, remembering that we must look to the past so that we can face the future. I continue to learn and progress myself as a Native Hawaiian and most importantly as a human being of this Earth. With love and respect,
-Kahu Ka'alekahi

Bio

Vene is a cultural practitioner whose Hawaiian roots touch everyone he meets. An important figure in Hawaiian Fishpond restoration and master of the sailing canoe (wa’a), Vene truly embodies the Aloha Spirit.. 

2011 - Present: HOE - Hawaiian Outrigger Experience
Co-Founder / Part Owner
2012 - Present: Fleetwood's on Front St. Restaurant - Cultural Advisor

2014 - Present: Manuteanuie Entertainment/Productions

Wedding Officiant / Event Hosts
Performing weddings, coconut husking demonstrations, poi pounding demonstrations, and sharing Hawaiian culture with performances of chants and songs.

2015 - Present: Maui Ocean Center
Host / Guest Speaker
2014- Documentary Film: Breath of Life

Main Actor
2016 Movie: Kuleana-Actor

Bio

Aloha! I am Reverend Kekoa Yap and I am a native Hawaiian, a Kumu Hula (teacher of hula), and chanter…. Welcome!

As an ordained minister, I offer authentic Hawaiian wedding ceremonies complete with Hawaiian blessings and oli (chant), as well as traditional and other non-denominational ceremonies, such as blessings for a new business or home.

I am also available for vow renewals and commitment ceremonies of any kind, for which the Hawaiian tradition is especially appropriate.

My weddings have been featured in Pacific Rim Wedding Magazine.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Aloha,
Reverend Kekoa Yap


BIO - DENNIS CHONG‐IMAMURA - Oahu Officiant


Kāhea in the Hawaiian language dictionary by Pukui and Elbert is “to call, to cry out, 
invoke, greet, name ...; to summon, a call, alarm.” Life for me has been a progression of calls and 
summons from the Creator who lives in each of us, from Akua – from God. When a person 
responds with a ʻyes” to a kāhea, then he should accept the kuleana or responsibilities that are 
inherent with it. Briefly, these are the kāhea I have responded to over my lifetime:
Seminarian for 6 years – St. Stephenʻs Seminary, Kāneʻohe, Hawaiʻi


Juvenile Detention Officer 1 ½ years, State of Hawaiʻi
Federal Agent for 33 years – DEA, U.S. Customs, ICE
Police Commission Investigator for 8 years – Honolulu Police Commission
Kumu Hula for 14 years – Hālau Hula Keliʻi Puʻukū O Ke Ao
Ordained Minister & Licensed Marriage Celebrant in the State of Hawaiʻi


Conduit for Blessings, Cleansings, Healings
Throughout my law enforcement career, I served my people – the world ­ with aloha,  with love. It was no accident nor contradiction that I embraced the hula and practiced it with the 
mana or divine energy within, and with the hā or chosen breath of life. The series of kāhea then 
started. First with a request from a family member, friend, or colleague to say grace or pule for 
gatherings of people before a meal; then home and office blessings, cleansings, healings, rites of 
commital and marriage celebration. I asked often, “Why me?” and the response in different 
forms basically came back, “Why not?” Thus the kāhea and my kuleana once I said yes. 
I believe in God and that there is God – in His image ­ in every person. I believe that we 
should love or aloha one another (remember the greatest commandment?). I believe that there 
are many paths to God, whom we call by different names. I say all this because this is who I am 
as a kahu and celebrant – very important to know and understand for those seeking a sacred path, 
as in marriage.


With mana and hā I relate to the land, the ʻāina and all its people in the warmth of aloha.  I conduct ceremonies within the parameters of traditional Hawaiian protocols, using ti leaves, 
Hawaiian salt, special water, the sounds of  hula and most importantly, oli (chants) that 
communicate with God, with the forces of nature, with generations that have passed and with 
generations to come.


I conclude by saying that I am but a conduit for Akua. It is not my power but His. I have 
been informed that I am helped in sacred endeavors and healings with the wonderful grace, light 
and sword of the Archangel Michael. Why me? Why not?
Mahalo Ke Akua and Blessings to us all.